Cycling and Racism in Early 20th-Century Indianapolis

A piece that I co-wrote.

Invisible Indianapolis

Jeremy Lahey and Paul R. Mullins 

AJuly 2, 1898 ad in the Indianapolis News hailed the opening of the Newby Oval velodrome. A July 2, 1898 ad in the Indianapolis News hailed the opening of the Newby Oval velodrome (click on thumbnail for larger image).

Bicycling captured the national imagination in the late-19th century, and Indianapolis residents were among the scores of Americans who embraced bicycling for transportation, recreation, and sport.  By 1896 bicycling was sufficiently popular in Indianapolis that the Indianapolis News predicted the city would have “over fifteen thousand wheelmen and wheelwomen” that summer.  A year later the paper reported that the canal towpath was clogged on weekends with recreational cyclists riding from the city to Fairview Park and Broad Ripple.  While many Americans took to bikes for recreational riding, a bike race was held at the State Fair in 1881, and by the 1890s bike races were a staple of the local sports pages.  In 1898, Arthur Newby opened a…

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